PARCC Results are in and New Jersey is Improving!

(This is a guest post by Tish Johnson, the Coalition Manager of We Raise New Jersey and a N.J. public school parent. We Raise New Jersey is a collective of statewide organizations that advocate to ensure every student in New Jersey graduates prepared for college and career. Tish has over 15 years of combined financial, government, legal and corporate knowledge that she brings with her to education advocacy sector.) A coalition of parents, educators, and …

Fact Check for Phil Murphy and Sheila Oliver

Last week AFT President Randi Weingarten hosted teachers from Newark, Perth Amboy, North Bergen, and Garfield for a meet-and-greet with gubernatorial shoo-ins Phil Murphy and his lieutenant governor running partner Sheila Oliver, reports Tapinto.  The purpose of the meeting was to give teachers opportunities to “share ideas for improving education and to voice their concerns regarding the current state of public education.” Great. Except for this: our future state leaders need a little educating themselves. …

The Grown-Up Version of PARCC: Can We Measure Up?

The New Jersey Department of Education just released our children’s 2017 scores on the state standardized PARCC tests in language arts and math. The news is good: students improved in both subjects. And, yet, the news is hard to hear because scores aren’t as high as we’re used to seeing on our older tests, ASK (grades 3-8) and HSPA (the former high school diploma qualifying test).  After all, unvarnished appraisals of student achievement are hard …

Look What Happens When District and Charter Schools Collaborate

(This is a guest post by Charles Sahm, who is director of education policy at the Manhattan Institute, a think tank whose mission is to develop and disseminate new ideas that foster greater economic choice and individual responsibility. It was originally published in the Star-Ledger.) It’s often noted that the original vision for charter schools, championed by legendary teachers’ union leader Al Shanker and others, was that they’d be “laboratories of innovation” whose lessons could inform …

Let’s Play a Guessing Game

There is a sector of schools in New Jersey that rigorously creams off top-performing students, provides little (if any) support for students with disabilities, doesn’t backfill (accept students to fill open spots when students leave), increases segregation, and is paid for by a combination of tax dollars and tuition payments from traditional district schools. If you get your state education news from NJEA, Education Law Center, or Save Our Schools-NJ, then you would most  likely …