Voices from the NJ Parent Summit: Erica Explains It All!

Meet Erica Beverett of Lumberton, New Jersey. A Head Start teacher in Trenton, Erica is attending the NJ Parent Summit this weekend for the Leadership Track, which prepares parents to engage other parents in becoming strong advocates for their children. Erica didn’t use to live in Lumberton (Burlington County). She and her two children, now fourteen and thirteen, lived in Willingboro, about fifteen minutes away. On a personal note, I used to cover Willingboro on …

It’s Time for the Third Annual NJ Parent Summit!

Today I head for Mt. Laurel, where 250 parents hailing from all over the state — Atlantic City, Camden, Jersey City, Newark, Passaic, Paterson, Plainfield, Trenton, Englewood —  will convene for the weekend to sharpen their advocacy skills. Session topics include”Choice and Healthy Competition: Demanding the Schools our Children Deserve,”  “Having the Right Conversations with the Right Staff in Your Child’s School,” “Advocating for Exceptional Students,” and a host of others, all focused on empowering …

The “Virtuous Circle” in Camden: Positive Progress Yields Community Support

Bryan Morton, Executive Director of Great Camden Schools, has an op-ed in the Courier Post that traces the arc of Camden Public Schools’ transformation, which he ascribes to the leadership of state-appointed Superintendent Paymon Rouhanifard, a series of reforms that brought in hybrid renaissance schools, heightened expectations for students and teachers, and a growing sense of hope among Camden families. Morton also describes a trip he took with other community members to the State Board of …

What Can My District Do to Increase Parent Engagement?

I live in a township in the middle of New Jersey that’s home to a culturally and economically diverse school district. That’s not very common in this state’s highly segregated school system. My local stretch of U.S. Route 206 tells the tale: Driving north, you’ll first pass the inner-city school district of Trenton where 90 percent of students are economically disadvantaged (i.e., meet the requirements for free or reduced-price lunch, the government’s proxy for poverty), …